We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The TripAdvisor website may not display properly.
We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.

Daytrips from Glasgow

Print this guide Created by Jules Morgan
Daytrips from Glasgow
Whether driving or using the excellent public transport network, a relatively short journey from Glasgow will whisk you away to another world.
Good for: Families, Groups, Seniors, Individuals
Seasons: Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter
8 ratings 8 ratings
 
South Ayrshire
South Ayrshire

The village of Alloway is home to the Robert Burns Birthplace Museum and the Robert Burns Heritage Trail. Highlights of the trail include Auld Kirk Alloway, Burns Cottage, Burns Monument Gardens and the 13th century Brig O'Doon. South of Alloway along the attractive A719 coastal road is Culzean Castle and Country Park which offers much of interest all ages. En route is an unusual... More

The village of Alloway is home to the Robert Burns Birthplace Museum and the Robert Burns Heritage Trail. Highlights of the trail include Auld Kirk Alloway, Burns Cottage, Burns Monument Gardens and the 13th century Brig O'Doon. South of Alloway along the attractive A719 coastal road is Culzean Castle and Country Park which offers much of interest all ages. En route is an unusual roadside attraction called Electric Brae, a 'magnetic hill' where a car left out of gear will appear to go uphill due to an optical illusion. A few minutes drive from Culzean Castle is the famous Open Golf championship course at Turnberry where the clubhouse is open to the public. Less

South Lanarkshire
South Lanarkshire

New Lanark World Heritage Village is an 18th century historic village and visitor attraction, popular with families and those with an interest in social history. It's a short walk from here to the Falls of Clyde.

Isle of Bute
Isle of Bute

Mount Stuart House is one of Britain’s finest pieces of Gothic revival domestic architecture and a popular visitor attraction. Interiors of the house are grand and elaborate and reflect the history and wealth of the Stuarts of Bute, who have been on the island for over 700 years. A quirky attraction at Rothesay harbour is the elaborately decorated Victorian public toilet.

Stirling
Stirling

There’s no finer place to take a crash course in Scotland’s bloody history than this compact university city. The magnificently-sited, and thoughtfully conserved, castle which stands atop a plug of volcanic rock made it the key to holding Scotland during Anglo-Scottish wars, and a substantial core of the medieval and Renaissance buildings of this royal burgh remain. The Castle... More

There’s no finer place to take a crash course in Scotland’s bloody history than this compact university city. The magnificently-sited, and thoughtfully conserved, castle which stands atop a plug of volcanic rock made it the key to holding Scotland during Anglo-Scottish wars, and a substantial core of the medieval and Renaissance buildings of this royal burgh remain. The Castle – probably Scotland’s most interesting - is the must-see sight, but other aspects of history are explored at the gloriously Gothic National Wallace Monument, which commemorates William (Braveheart) Wallace, and at the Bannockburn Heritage Centre, close to the site of the battle in 1314 which guaranteed Scotland’s survival as a nation, and which is about to be comprehensively revamped ahead of the battle’s 700th anniversary. A large student population gives the place a youthful vibe, and it’s a short distance from the superb scenery of the Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park. Note also that Corrieri’s is one of the country’s finest family-run Italian cafés. En route you can take in the engineering innovation that is Falkirk Wheel – a rotating boat lift that transports boats between two different canals. Less

Edinburgh
Edinburgh

Steeped in Celtic and medieval history, Edinburgh is a cultural tapestry that’s largely visually defined by hills, cathedrals, and the bold stone turrets of Edinburgh Castle. The city is also festival-happy - it's the site of several annual celebrations of art, music, theater, and comedy. Cheer on your favorite team at a football or rugby match, then relax over a pint in a local pub. A... More

Steeped in Celtic and medieval history, Edinburgh is a cultural tapestry that’s largely visually defined by hills, cathedrals, and the bold stone turrets of Edinburgh Castle. The city is also festival-happy - it's the site of several annual celebrations of art, music, theater, and comedy. Cheer on your favorite team at a football or rugby match, then relax over a pint in a local pub. A Scotch Whisky tour is a must, as is pinching your nose and digging bravely into a steaming plate of haggis. Less

Falkirk
Falkirk

The Falkirk Wheel is an innovative rotating boat lift which connects the Forth and Clyde canal with the Union canal. Visitors can take a boat ride on the lift. Falkirk's Callendar House has played host to many historical figures including Oliver Cromwell, Mary Queen of Scots and Bonnie Prince Charlie.

Glencoe
Glencoe

Glencoe, a designated National Scenic Area sometimes referred to as the Glen of Weeping, was the scene of the infamous 'Massacre of Glencoe' in 1692. The Glen has a number of viewing stops on the road through the valley, and the National Trust for Scotland has a visitor centre along the main route.

Note: This information was accurate when it was published, but can change without notice. Please be sure to confirm all rates and details directly with the companies in question before planning your trip.