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Casa di Santa Caterina

525 Reviews

Casa di Santa Caterina

525 Reviews
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Discover the life of St. Catherine of Siena
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Well-suited for time-limited travelers, this Florence day trip lets you conquer Tuscany's must-see sights in a day. Snap photos in front of the UNESCO World Heritage-listed Leaning Tower of Pisa (skip-the-line admission ticket available as an upgrade); taste wine in the Chianti region; and explore medieval San Gimignano. Plus, you'll travel between each place with ease and relax knowing the entire day is planned out in advance.
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Bourlingueur wrote a review Mar 2020
Albany, New York693 contributions261 helpful votes
We stopped at the Casa di Santa Caterine di Siena. It was early evening in November and the courtyard was in shadow. We stopped and quietly admired the Chapel.
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Date of experience: November 2019
1 Helpful vote
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Asiyah Noemi K wrote a review Mar 2020
Pula, Croatia4,381 contributions37,751 helpful votes
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In addition to St. Francis of Assisi Italians have another patron saint as a nation, namely Saint Catherine of Siena. A woman who, in her short earthly and great spiritual life, bore all the hardships and problems of the Church of her time. The shrine of St. Catharine of Siena presented us with the environment in which she lived during the 14th century. The native house of St. Caterina of Siena was transformed into a sanctuary in 1464 and there you can find many signs about her life. Catherine Benincas was born on 25 March 1347 in Siena, Fontebranda Street. She was the penultimate of the 25 children born in the large family as a twin sister with Giovanna that shortly after the birth dies. Her father Giacomo Benincasa and mother Lapa Piacenti were a wealthy family. They were engaged in dyeing fabric and leather. Siena was a rich city, and their wealth was based on the wool trade. Katarina since her childhood has been searching for silence, prayer, solitude, and regularly visits the nearby Basilica of Saint Dominic held by the Dominican Fathers. At only six years old (1353) she had her first vision. Over the roof of St. Dominic's Basilica, she saw a smiling Christ seated on a throne in papal garb accompanied by the apostles Peter and Paul and St. John the Evangelist. She decided to join the Dominicans, but as the family objected, she decided to cut her hair in protest. In isolation, she sought clarity and a path for three years. She watched God’s heart carefully to learn how to live according to God’s plans. Living in great intimacy with Jesus, in one vision Jesus instructed her to consecrate herself to the apostolate.Thus, she spent the rest of her life caring for the sick of the plague, visiting the poor, reconciling quarreling relatives, traveling, pursuing high politics and reconciling citys i states, advocating for the restoration of the Church and the return of Pope Gregory XI to Rome from Avignon. She found strength in the Eucharist. She did not eat anything for days, only receiving the Eucharist. So small, illiterate, St. Catharine became a Church scholar and co-protector of Europe: building in herself, in a deep dark cell, a place of encounter with God. She's worthy of awe. The House-Sanctuary consists of various environments, on the right the Chiesa del Crocifisso (Church of the Crucifix) (the artwork from which the St. Caterina received the stigmata in the Chiesa di Santa Cristina in Pisa in 1375), on the left the Oratorio Superiore (Upper Oratory) with beautiful majolica floor, the Oratorio della Camera frescoed in 1896 by Alessandro Franchi, and the Chiesa di Santa Caterina in Fontebranda, with a wooden statue by Neroccio and paintings by Della Pacchia and Sodoma.
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Date of experience: January 2020
155 Helpful votes4 Reposts
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HyMaryland wrote a review Feb 2020
Rockville, Maryland110 contributions90 helpful votes
Since I used to go to Mass at a St. Catherine of Siena, a visit was a must! We visited during our walking tour of Siena. We enjoyed our tour and seeing where she slept and prayed. No photos allowed.
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Date of experience: October 2019
3 Helpful votes
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westy54 wrote a review Sep 2019
Sydney, Australia6,488 contributions946 helpful votes
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There is a TripAdvisor listing for "Casa di Santa Caterina which I believe refers to the same set of buildings. This complex, the first buildings of which were turned into a sanctuary in 1464, consists of four main buildings which were built over the old house and gardens of Saint Caterina's family home. These buildings are: 1. The loggia and portico. this structure runs along the right hand side of the property from the entrance from the road and stops at an archway, with several steps down, to a porch in front of the Church of the Crucifix. The loggia and portico is only relatively recent, having been built in the 1940's, to honour Saint Caterina being proclaimed Patron Saint of Italy by Pope Pius XII. There are busts of Pope Pius XII and also of Pope Pius II who proclaimed her a Saint in 1461 and Pope John Paul II who proclaimed her patron of Europe in 1999. 2. Church of the Crucifix. This church dates from the early 17th century and was built to hold the Crucifix from which Saint Caterina received the stigmata in 1375. This small church has a single nave and is built in the shape of a Latin Cross. The crucifix is housed in a gilded frame that sits on the very ornate marble high altar. The ceiling of the church is covered with beautiful frescoes and gilded stucco ornamentation. The high altar and those on either side of the transept are a mass of polychrome marble and gold with some wonderful 17th and 18th century paintings, largely depicting scenes in the life of Saint Caterina. 3. Oratorio della Cucina. This relatively small rectangular oratory, which was originally the family's kitchen and later had some other living rooms added, dates from the late 16th century. The entrance to the Oratory is directly opposite the entrance to the church. This is a quite stunning Oratory with a blue coffered ceiling with gilded rosettes, a majolica floor (which is largely covered to prevent people walking on and damaging it) and a series of massive paintings on all four walls, largely dating from the 16th and 17th centuries, depicting scenes in the life of the Saint. Next to this Oratory is quite a large shop selling religious memorabilia and other souvenirs. There is also a life-sized statue of Saint Caterina with her arms outstretched. 4. Oratory of the Chamber. There is a stone stairway outside of the shop which takes you down to this Oratory where again there are a series of paintings of the Saint, many depicting scenes from her life as a child. At the back of this Oratory though is the cell and stone bed where the Saint used to live and sleep. Very humbling. This complex is well worth a visit and is free to enter.
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Date of experience: June 2019
2 Helpful votes
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GracesMum wrote a review Jun 2019
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania92 contributions53 helpful votes
I visited here already knowing a little bit about St Catherine of Siena. But this spot brought a comfort and peace to me, and I wish I could spend more time here. It's lovingly maintained & has a great gift shop, and it's free. St Catherine, ora pro nobis!
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Date of experience: June 2019
2 Helpful votes
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