We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The TripAdvisor website may not display properly.We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.

Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague

U stareho hrbitova 243/3a | 110 00, Prague 110 00, Czech Republic
+420 222 749 211
Website
Save
Book In Advance
More Info
US$141.28*
and up
Private Prague Full-Day Tour: Jewish Quarter and City Sights
More Info
US$41.31*
and up
Small-Group Historic Jewish Quarter Walking Tour in Prague
More Info
US$45.50*
and up
Jewish Prague Walking Tour
Map
Satellite
Map updates are paused. Zoom in to see updated info.
Reset zoom
Updating Map...
Neighbourhoods
Neighbourhoods
Overview
More
Permanent exhibition Children's Drawings from the Terezin Ghetto Located on the first floor, this exhibition focuses on the fate of Jewish children who were incarcerated in the Terezin ghetto during the Second World War. It is based on the now world famous children's drawings that were made in the ghetto between 1942 and 1944 under the supervision of the artist Friedl Dicker-Brandeis. These emotionally powerful drawings bear testimony to the persecution of Jews during the Nazi occupation of the Bohemian lands in 1939-45. They document the transports to Terezin and daily life in the ghetto, as well as the dreams of returning home and of life in the Jewish homeland of Palestine. The vast majority of the children perished in the gas chambers of Auschwitz-Birkenau. The Pinkas Synagogue is part of the Jewish Museum in Prague. The Pinkas Synagogue is the second oldest preserved synagogue in Prague. Bbuilt in the late Gothic style in 1535, it was founded by Aaron Meshulam Horowitz, a prominent member of the Prague Jewish Community, and probably named after his grandson, Rabbi Pinkas Horowitz. It was originally a place of prayer for the Horowitz family and was located near a ritual bath (mikveh). It was restored to its original form in 1950-54. Memorial to the Bohemian and Moravian Victims of the Shoah In 1955-60 the Pinkas Synagogue was turned into a memorial to the nearly 80,000 Jewish victims of the Shoah from Bohemia and Moravia. One of the earliest memorials of its kind in Europe, it is the work of two painters, Václav Boštík and Jiří John. After the Soviet invasion of 1968, the memorial was closed to the public for more than 20 years. It was fully reconstructed and reopened to the public in 1995 after the fall of the Communist regime.
  • Excellent59%
  • Very good28%
  • Average10%
  • Poor1%
  • Terrible2%
Travellers talk about
LOCATION
U stareho hrbitova 243/3a | 110 00, Prague 110 00, Czech Republic
Josefov
CONTACT
Website
+420 222 749 211
Write a Review
Reviews (652)
Traveller rating
Traveller type
Time of year
Language

1 - 10 of 292 reviews

Reviewed 2 days ago

Walking through room after room with names painted on them, floor to ceiling, totalling 78,000 is overwhelming. It is inconceivable that almost 100 times more space would be needed to include the names of all Jewish people who were murdered during the war. This experience...More

Thank JDOntarioCanada
Reviewed 2 days ago

A tranquil place for contemplation of the nearly 80,000 Jewish people who died during the Second World War.

Thank Nomad120452
Reviewed 1 week ago

This is a visit not to be missed.. a moving experience . The synagogue's walls are all recorded the from top to bottom with names of the people from the Czech Republic & their predecessor known to have died as a result of the holocaust....More

Thank apocalipse
Reviewed 1 week ago

Really brought it home as to what occurred during the war but was very busy and difficult to get near in parts .Still was worth visiting

Thank fiona300454
Reviewed 1 week ago

This is not an easy place..........it reminds us of how evil and cruel the world can be. There was a wonderful woman working there that shared her family times during the war.

Thank Debbie M
Reviewed 1 week ago

This synagogue and attached graveyard are a fascinating and moving reminder of WW2 and its impact on the lives of hundreds of people. A must visit.

Thank Jennie P
jewishmuseminprague, Manažer at Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague, responded to this reviewResponded 1 week ago

Thank you very much and we´ll be pleased to see you again in the museum.

Reviewed 1 week ago

This Synagogue is a reminder of the Jewish history in Prague and the horrors of the Nazi occupation and murder of the Jewish population in Prague and throughout Europe. One of the oldest Jewish cemeteries in Europe and a true historical site worth visiting for...More

Thank Jimmy B
jewishmuseminprague, Manažer at Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague, responded to this reviewResponded 1 week ago

Thank you very much and we´ll be pleased to see you again in the museum.

Reviewed 2 weeks ago

Do the whole tour of the synagogues and cemetery, It will take a few hours of walking in a small area of town, but worth it.

Thank 174PeterH
jewishmuseminprague, Manažer at Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague, responded to this reviewResponded 1 week ago

Thank you very much and we´ll be pleased to see you again in the museum.

Reviewed 2 weeks ago

Mere words cannot express this experience of being here and reading the thousands of names on every wall..I had no idea before we came. Such incredible sadness within such an architecturally beautiful place of worship. Very, very moving. We were here as part of an...More

Thank bluesmama11
jewishmuseminprague, Manažer at Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague, responded to this reviewResponded 1 week ago

Thank you very much and we´ll be pleased to see you again in the museum.

Reviewed 2 weeks ago

Found a tour on Viator and got a very informative tour guide. The Jewish Museum is impressive and impactful.

Thank Ron D
jewishmuseminprague, Manažer at Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague, responded to this reviewResponded 1 week ago

Thank you for your review.

Nearby
Josefov
Josefov houses Prague’s Jewish community. This small
neighbourhood centered around Široká street is
completely surrounded by Staré Město (Old Town). As
the former Jewish Ghetto, today all that remains are a
few synagogues and the oldest surviving Jewish
cemetery in Europe. The narrow streets were once small
enough that a person could touch the houses on both
sides. You can still feel the dignity and history this
...More
Nearby Restaurants
Pepe Nero
720 reviews
.17 km away
Mlejnice
951 reviews
.15 km away
Les Moules
717 reviews
.08 km away
Kolonial Pub
714 reviews
.12 km away
Nearby Attractions
St. Nicholas Church, the Old Town Square
764 reviews
.12 km away
Old Jewish Cemetery
1,547 reviews
.06 km away
Old-New Synagogue (Staronova synagoga)
475 reviews
.07 km away
Ask a question
Questions & Answers
traveler9519
10 July 2016|
AnswerShow all 3 answers
Response from jewishmuseminprague | Property representative |
The prayer is "El malei rachamim", a funeral prayer used by the Ashkenazi Jewish community. The chazzan recites it, for the ascension of the souls of the dead, during the funeral, going up to the grave of the departed... More
2
Votes
Google Translation
barryjay
20 August 2015|
AnswerShow all 3 answers
Response from jewishmuseminprague | Property representative |
Yes, tours with a certified guide of the Jewish Museum in Prague are available for individual visitors as well as organized groups. Guided tours in English are held daily during the museum's opening hours usually at 10.30 am... More
0
Votes
Google Translation