Historic Walking Areas in Singapore

THE 10 BEST Singapore Historic Walking Areas

Historic Walking Areas in Singapore

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37 places sorted by traveller favourites
  • Things to do ranked using Tripadvisor data including reviews, ratings, photos, and popularity.
Showing results 1-30 of 37

What travellers are saying

  • Brown_Samantha
    Kennewick, WA1,683 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Great pedestrian bridge that will offer wonderful view to the whole bay area, including some interesting structures like the Marina Bay Sands Hotel and the Arts & Sciences Museum. Suggest taking the walk during both day and night times.

    We cross the bridge and continued all the way to the Singapore Flyer. It is the world's first curved double helix bridge. Makes great picture taking!
    Written 8 March 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Dan L
    Bunbury, Australia7,596 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    You need to hone your bargaining skills and ignore the marked prices on the merchandise. There are shops and street stalls selling clothing, 'fake' watches, street food, trinkets, ceramics and just about everything else that can be purchased elsewhere in Chinatown. The street derives its name from the Sri Mariamman Temple which was established in 1827.
    Written 31 December 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • TassieTravellers99
    Launceston, Australia3,198 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    This sculpture is one of several that border the Singapore River following Boat Quay. A good place to start the walk is Cavenagh Bridge which is the oldest in Singapore. The sculptures have informative signboards describing the background of each installation.
    Written 28 March 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • JackyTanSG
    Singapore, Singapore2,742 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    A few minutes walk from behind City Square, you will find Petain Road.

    It has a controversial history as it was named after Henri-Philippe Pétain, a French General who led France to victory against Germany in World War 1. But later on in his eighties, he also collaborated with Nazi regime and adopted repressive measure against Jews. Hence, people who understands may not feel okay when there is a road named after the French General.

    Today, this quiet street is home to a row of charming conservation terraced houses. The controversy today is that the back alley is also a designated red light district of Singapore.

    Hence, the beautiful road though small, has a very rich controversial history.
    Written 30 August 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • kim buay p
    Singapore, Singapore11,325 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    South Bridge Road is named as it is south of the Elgin Bridge. It connects the “Big Town”(current Chinatown Precinct) with the “Small Town” (present North Bridge Road area). It is a major road and many businesses were set up along this road. There are two religious landmarks, the Jamae Mosque and the Sri Mariamman Temple built in 1826 and 1827 respectively along this road. There are many two or three storey shophouses built in different times. Exception is No 251 which is four storey. Many shophouses here are considered modern and were built with steel and reinforced concrete. They are simple with common features like thin sunshade fins and the iconic flagstaff.
    No. 22 used to be one place to go to for winter clothes and items.
    Previously there was a high concentration of goldsmiths, jewellers and pawn shops but only a few remain today such as On Cheong Jewellery (No 251) which was established in 1936.
    A number of hostels and boutique hotels have replaced these goldsmiths such as Alder Hostel and Heritage Hostel.
    There used to be a few branches of banks located here. The prominent one was the OCBC whose art-deco style logo can still be seen at Nos. 237-243. There is no banks here now.
    One of the oldest stores here is Eu Yan Sang at Nos. 267-271. This is the first Eu Yan Sang outlet in Singapore set up by Eu Tong Sen. The building was designed by Alfred Bidwell from the firm Swan & Maclaren. He was also responsible for the design of the Raffles Hotel and Victoria Memorial Hall.
    One of the oldest confectioneries, Tong Heng, is located at No 285 and it is famous for its egg tarts.
    Written 20 June 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • lucycan
    San Diego, CA3,534 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Geylang is where the red light district is and that has its own very interesting history and present. But its also a neighborhood with plenty of working class folks (most seemed to be India) and a wealth of food such as frog porridge. I highly recommend you check it out after dark.
    Written 5 September 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Oldjack
    Greater Melbourne, Australia27,964 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    This is not an area of Singapore that is well known to tourists but it appears to be one of the hippiest places in Singapore with loads of history. It came to life from a swamp in the 1930's with Art Deco apartments most of which have been retained as they were.There are some interesting restaurants, a market that sells street food that is great, a 90 year old temple (Monkey Temple) and the buildings themselves are worth seeing. There are no bright lights and signs and the place has a trendy vibe. Catch the Green Line to Tiong Bahru, take a left and walk Tiong Bahru Road and then go into the area with the art deco apartments and follow your nose.
    Written 25 March 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • kim buay p
    Singapore, Singapore11,325 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    I visited its open house and took a guided tour in June 2019 during the weekend. This elegant building was designed by Thomas A. Cargill, a Freemason and municipal engineer. It was built in the English Renaissance style with white doric columns on the ground floor but ionic columns on the first storey. The beige exterior walls are decorated with white floral garlands and panels of their dark blue iconic logo of the square and compass.

    The building’s basement houses the Masonic library and offices, while the ground floor is occupied by a kitchen, restaurant and bar. Members of the public are allowed to dine in the restaurant.
    The second floor of the building, known as the Temple, has various rooms used for Masonic meetings and ceremonies.

    William Napier and William Henry Macleod Read were the first and second Singapore Freemasons to be initiated. The latter became the first District Grand Master of the Eastern Archipelago from 1858 to 1885.
    Freemasonry in Singapore was founded in 1845 and Sir Stamford Raffles was a Freemason.
    John Turnbull Thomson, another Freemason , was the builder of the Horsburgh Lighthouse on Pedra Branca in 1851. Horsburgh Lighthouse is the first lighthouse in the world to have a masonic ceremony held at the laying of the foundation stone.
    Written 20 May 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Hieatsreych
    Philippines342 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Despite the distance from our stay at JEN Orchardgateway, we made it a point to visit this place as it had always been on my bucket list. The main attraction was the vibrant and picturesque row of colorful houses, perfect for capturing stunning photos for your Instagram feed.
    Written 7 July 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Suen T
    Malaysia31 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    Quite an ordeal to find the place. Heard it was then closed down or something. Wasn't as scary as I thought but was an eye opening experience. Sad that these kind of places started to be demolished in Sg.
    Written 6 February 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Leonard L
    6 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Obscure but interesting reservoir. Need gentle trekking to reach there. Better to read up a little on its history first before going, so as to understand its existence, its features and surrounding areas.
    Written 21 December 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • kim buay p
    Singapore, Singapore11,325 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    This walk along Jalan Besar and the surrounding streets is fascinating as there are many elaborately decorated shophouses and Art Deco buildings in this area. After exiting from Rochor MRT station, we started our walk along Jalan Besar.
    1) The blue Art Deco Hotel 81 building has outstanding green glass windows and photogenic spiral staircase at the back. One purpose of the spiral staircase is to enable the collection of the night-soil from the upper level.

    2) At Dunlop street is the visually striking Abdul Gafoor Mosque which is still not opened to the public yet. It is a National Monument.
    3) At Dickson Road just a few steps from Jalan Besar is the Wanderlust Hotel. It is a four-storey 1920s Art Deco style building which was once Hong Wen School. The intricately painted ceramic tiles on its front facade and the classic stained glass windows on the upper storey has been restored. The ceramic tiles are so beautiful.

    4) At the junction of Veerasamy Road and Jln Besar are two stunning Rococo style shophouses facing each other on either side of Veerasamy Road. Again both buildings are covered with colourful tiles in its front facade. The corinthian capitals on the pilasters are also elaborate.

    5) At 61-69 Syed Alwi Road is a unique row of nine Rococo style shophouses. They are distinguished by a pair of enormous ox-eye window openings between a flat arch window on second storey. Pale green bas-relief festoon mouldings surround the oval windows. The ventilation screens feature elaborate Malay tracery patterns on the ground floor. No 214 is completely bedecked with colorful ceramic tiles. There are two large multisectional tiles panels showing sceneries and some Chinese folklore characters.

    6) At Sam Leong Road is a row of outstanding shophouses with colourful balustrades on the balcony of its second storey and Chinoiserie-style facade.
    7) At the junction of Allenby Road are two buildings. Allenby House is first 4 storey building along Jalan Besar. Its windows are painted in different pastel colours which quite resembles the Old Hill Street Police Station building. The other is the former International Hotel – now Earnest Restaurant-built in 1937 by architectural firm of Ho Kwong Yew.
    8) The 18 stunning terrace houses at Petain Road.
    9) Holy Trinity church at 1 Hamilton Road has Chinese-style green tiled roofs and decorative elements and the church was designed by Ho Kwong Yew in a vernacular Art Deco style.

    10) 161 Lavender St is a row of 11 shophouses between Foch and Tyrwhitt Rds which have been conserved and retain their original Art deco facades with pastel tiles. The plaster figures on the roof pediment facing Foch rd depict soldiers carrying Nationalist Flag of the Republic of China, as company owner Lee Kong Chian was an ardent supporter of the Chinese Nationalist Movement of Sun Yat Sen.
    There are three dim sum houses along Jln Besar and many other coffee shops for refreshment and lunch stops.
    Written 11 December 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • SOH KIEN PENG
    Singapore, Singapore6,671 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The Blair Plain Conservation Area always impressed me with the architecturally intrinsic compact cluster of `baba' two- and three- Storey shop houses and terrace houses. The conserved houses are colorful and attractive with their unique floor tiles and decorative wooden doors and along the five-foot way studded with beautiful potted plants of beautiful flowers and greenery. The atmosphere is tranquil and serene, and I enjoyed roaming around these nostalgic and photogenic conserved houses located the four main roads: Spottiswoode Park Road, Neil Road, Everton Road and Blair Road.

    I have an emotional attachment to these houses as my late great grandfather was living in one of these gorgeous houses along Blair Road when he was alive. I was only 6 years old when he passed away at the age of 92. He was a successful merchant and was the founder of the Soh Clan Association. I could still vividly remember the timber staircase in his house, and you could hear the foot stomping as you ascended the stairs to the second Storey and the many Peranakan antique vases he had in his back yard.

    I also noticed few of the street murals drawn by the self-taught Mr Yip Yew Chong and I think they fit well into the early colonial life picture of Singaporeans.

    This place is a memory lane for me.
    Written 14 June 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • kim buay p
    Singapore, Singapore11,325 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Goodwood Hill is like a secret garden in the heart of town. This secluded, tree-lined enclave of black and white houses are arranged in a circular loop. It is named after the Goodwood Estate in West Sussex. The houses were built around 1910 by Public Works Department (PWD) as accommodation for very high ranking civil servants, hence the houses here are larger than that in Nassim Road and Seton Close. These houses were inspired by the plantation houses of mid-19th century, They are usually two-storeys with broad eaves and deep verandahs on all sides. Both the broad eaves and verandahs kept out the rain and prevented the heat of the sun from reaching the inner core of the house. The black and white bamboo chicks can be raised at night to enjoy the ambient breezes. There are the ubiquitous centrally-placed carriage porch supported by paired columns and pyramidal roof. The kitchen and servants’ quarter were at the back detached from the main part of the building but connected by a covered walkway for privacy and safety reasons since most cooking were done on charcoal stove then, a serious fire hazard. No 3 is the oldest house built around 1900. No 4,6 and 10 are larger and enjoy the best locations on the hill. 10AB is the grandest on Goodwood Hill and it was intended for a senior member of the colonial judiciary.⁰
    Written 22 April 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • kim buay p
    Singapore, Singapore11,325 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    No 4 Nassim Road is the Japanese Creative Centre. It is a single-storey colonial building painted entirely in white. "Innovation and Tradition" is the main theme of the Centre. The Centre showcases Japan's "soft power", such as pop-culture and traditional arts, besides creating space for experiencing the charms of Japan.
    There is a beautiful landscaped wall outside Nassim Park Residences which is instagrammable-worthy. Opposite to Eden Hall is a slope leading to some black and white houses built in 1910 to house civil servants in the colonial administration.
    These houses are slightly smaller than those in Goodwood Hill.
    Eden Hall stands out with its distinctive facade of white foliage on a pale grey background and it is aptly called the "Wedgewood House". It was built in 1904 by the renowned architect, John Bidwell, of Swan and Maclaren for Mr. Manasseh. He was a Jewish rice and opium merchant from Baghdad. He also owned the Goodwood Park Hotel previously. In the mid 1950s, his step-son sold Eden Hall for a nominal sum to the British Government and this mansion has been the residence of the British High Commissioners in Singapore ever since. The architecture is described as Edwardian with some aspects of English mock Tudor and the Anglo-Indian style.
    At the Lermit Road junction, there is a slope leading to Arwaa Mansion which has two addresses, No 46B and 48. It is a palatial mansion and there is a big green field beside it. Going down the slope will lead to Dalvey Road. The view of this mansion with its "aquaduct" reminds one of the English country setting.
    Written 18 April 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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