Nature/ Wildlife Areas in Singapore

THE 10 BEST Singapore Nature & Wildlife Areas

Nature & Wildlife Areas in Singapore

Types of Attractions
Nature & Parks
Nature & Parks
Traveller rating
Neighbourhoods
Good for
24 places sorted by traveller favourites
  • Things to do ranked using Tripadvisor data including reviews, ratings, photos, and popularity.

What travellers are saying

  • eVe 🇸🇬🇸🇬🇸🇬
    Singapore, Singapore760 contributions
    For travellers who want to stay off the usual tourist attractions, a hike into MacRitchie forest trails is worth exploring. There are many trails to hike and it can take from 2 to 4 hours including return trip within the Catchment Area. One can spot monkeys and squirrels along the trails.

    The Tree Top Walk is located 500m from the Ranger Station. Toilets and water top up are available at the Ranger Station.

    The trails are easy for those who are fit and exercise regularly.

    By Bus:
    Nearest bus stop 51071. Bus #52, 74, 93, 157,130, 132, 156, 157, 162, 162M, 165, 166, 167, 852 and 855, 980 which drop at the bus stop 51071. Walk 10 minutes to the trailhead.
    Written 28 August 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Gaza74
    Wodonga, Australia193 contributions
    My wife & I visited the Night Safari yesterday evening, we entered at 7:15pm, our 1st stop was the Creatures of the Night show in the Amphitheater, this was Awesome, as for the remainder of the Night Safari, for the most part, it was fantastic, although slightly better than the day time zoo the directional signage isn’t great, we walked the marked trails, which appears to avoid some of the animals (maybe that was that average directional signage again), we missed the lions😢 due to this, we got some great photos on the walking trails, we were frustrated at a number of people who were very loud and scaring off the animals, we were patient & were rewarded with some great views & photos, we skipped the tram at 1st as the lines were crazy & they packed people in like sardines, we had also read mixed reviews on the tram, we finally jumped on the tram at 9:30pm, we got straight on but had to wait until they filled it a bit more, the information delivered on the tram was fantastic, however they don’t stop to allow you to take photos, even when we stopped the tram kept moving rolling back then moving forward (making it almost impossible to take photos in the darkness/low light)which was quite disappointing, there were also a couple of ignorant/selfish people taking photos with the flash even though you are repeatedly told not to use a flash???
    Written 14 January 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Sassybowwow
    52 contributions
    Although I’m a Singaporean, this was my first visit to Sungei Buloh. It didn’t disappoint! We went at high tide on a rainy day (the worst time to see crocs and otters) but we still saw a white-bellied sea eagle which was kindly pointed out to us by one of the volunteers Calvin. We bumped into him at Eagle Point. We walked around the rest of the reserve and met another very helpful and friendly Indian gentleman called Kris (not sure how to spell his name) on a buggy who gave us a lot of information about the wildlife there. On our return journey, we actually saw a 3m croc hanging out by the gates of the reservoir. Apparently he waits there for the reservoir gates to open and catches the fish that come out with the flow lol. Kris came round at that moment on his buggy and gave us some background on the croc which made it very special. If you see any of the park staff/volunteers, do speak to them as they have so much knowledge and are willing to share. Calvin and Kris made our visit all the more special so thank you very much!
    Written 15 January 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Davidjellis
    Lowestoft, UK8,809 contributions
    We visited Mount Faber as part of a cruise ship excursion and was told by our guide that it was the second highest 'mountain' in Singapore. Calling it a mountain is a little flattering as it's just a few hundred meters tall, lower than many of the buildings in the city, but the views were worth the short stop.

    In one direction you have views over the city, and in the other you can see Sentosa Island and the imposing 'Reflections at Keppel Bay' condominiums. We accessed the mountain top via coach and a short walk, however one of the most popular ways of getting there is the Singapore Cable Car, where the line from Sentosa Island finishes.

    The top of the mountain is very wooded with many trees and wildlife a plenty. On our walk a large 'grasshopper / cricket' type creature landed on my back...it must have been big as I felt it land through my clothes, but I didn't get the chance to take a photo as our guide swiped at it with his stick and it left the scene before I could get a good look at it!

    It's a popular hiking location and I can see why as it was a nice viewpoint and the mountain looked like a great place to spot wildlife etc. I wish we had longer there to explore but sadly our time was limited to a short photo stop. Well worth checking out.
    Written 28 January 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • SOH KIEN PENG
    Singapore, Singapore6,658 contributions
    I wandered my way here to explore the historical military site of Fort Pasir Panjang. It is located on the coastal cliff near to the car park B. I entered the nature reserve via the Berlayer Creek mangrove trail. The environment was peaceful and calm. At the look-out point, I sat down to appreciate the sapphire sea water that came in to nourish the mangrove roots. The heavy buzzing of the cicada sound like little alarm welcoming me to the rustic greenery on both sides of the board walk.

    It was breezy taking the coastal walk to the park and I like to hear the rhematic splashing of the sea water against the rocky bank.  From the jetty, I walked my way to the fort area. As I walked up the slope, I saw the site where the British erected the gunnery and the artillery to prevent a naval attack at the southern harbor. The British constructed the most impregnable fortress to guard against intrusions but during the Second World War, the Japanese attacked Singapore from the northern coast instead of the southern coast. The defense strategy did not work, and Singapore lost to the Japanese within a week of fighting.  
     
    This part of the nature reserve is rather quiet and covered by dense vegetation. I took about an hour to roam around and walked my way to the top and then back to the park. I took the same way out by taking a return walk along the Berlayer Creek.  

    While walking home, I pondered: would Singapore has fallen if the Japanese would attack from the south instead of from the north? 
    Written 12 November 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • KGB777
    Singapore, Singapore41,727 contributions
    I was last here at the end of Feb with the kids. Plenty of space for children to go scooting or bike riding on relatively quiet paths. The playground is normally quite good here too, but on the occasion of our visit it was undergoing repair. There's also some beach access, but of course the water is filthy and there's a lot of rubbish floating onto the shore.
    Written 12 June 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Peter S
    Rome, Italy3,952 contributions
    Review of St John’s Island, Singapore

    Sunday – all day - and where better to explore ‘new’ country than on one of those ‘outer-islands’ off the south coast of the ‘mainland’. This was an easy option and so was getting to our destination (Grab Taxis are as close as your cell phone). Half of our group had already been there, and the descriptions of the beaches and vegetation had remained – both redeveloped in recent years and, too, the historical significance of these islands to the original inhabitants and to the colonial administration alike - were sufficient attraction. There’s also that unique view of the coastline and the ships at anchor when seen from the ferry boats.
    All was going well until we set foot on the island …. it was then that the rain set in; and it rained non-stop for a good three hours – the best part of the day. Just to make sure we would enjoy the beaches the winds got up to match the rain … and they were cold.
    That all said, we donned our rain gear, opened the umbrellas and trudged the 1.6 km track around the edge of St John’s Island, across the causeway between St. John’s and the neighbouring Lazarus Island heading for the classic (and man-improved) ‘South Sea Island beach’ to the east of the island. There’s also a line of camping sites behind this shoreline somewhere in the dense green foliage. There was nobody camping. There were, however, wet-looking people in groups/families sheltering beneath the trees. There were, perhaps, >50 people actually in the sea – where it was a deal warmer. We accepted an hour catching the drips beneath the trees and slowly getting wetter before heading for the picnic shelter at the far end of the beach by the high masonry groyne (which was clearly breaking up from the impact of the sea). At least 20 other people had already done much the same - many of whom had changed and headed back into the water. Half our group did the same. It was, however, a reasonable place to sit and eat lunch; and we enjoyed talking with a couple of family groups whom we had joined out-of-the-rain – foreigners all.
    Sure, looking back, we could have figured the weather from the grey nature of the sky when we set out that morning, but we only had the one-non-working-day available. Monday meant work and school. What to do? We took our chances … and enjoyed the good bits.
    And, for the two of us new to this small off-shore island, this included the the ferry rides out and return to the terminal at Marine South Pier. This is where you buy the ferry tickets. Prices varied around SS$20/adult. Sure, we’d all been to the terminal before (there’s an MRT station; it’s where you find the Singapore Maritime Gallery and the deck on the roof provides those views across the straits to Indonesia and the estimated 60 freight ships waiting their turn to access Singapore port).
    And, that other aspect of travelling off-shore close to the commercial centre is the great skyline view of the images of a modern seaboard city – high rise buildings that stand proud above Strait’s View about a kilometre from the shoreline. The reality of the view, however, is one of change that continues to impact upon this part of the island. An estimated 5km2 land beneath the current container port to the west of the city is scheduled for central city expansion (as the new Tuas Freight Port >30 km further west takes precedence). Developments for those time travellers from the 22nd century who are already here amongst us? Of course.
    But, I digress.
    Check out St John’s Island and you quickly realise that there are three small islands grouped together of which St. John’s is/was the original focal point. A causeway now links St. John’s Island with Lazarus Island which, given the fragmented nature of the north of the island, now includes what was once Seringat Island – joined to Lazarus Island with sea dredged in-fill. Offshore to the central islands there’s the smaller Kusu Island – highlighted as the tortoise/turtle island. These – together with two other local islands – are known as the Marine Park Islands.
    The importance of these islands to the earlier administration came from their proximity to the expanding colonial settlement 6 km across the straits. The islands once housed, in turn, quarantine centre, hospitals, drug rehabilitation, refugees and aquaculture R&D. Nowadays there are no people living full-time on the islands; the islands have become a sanctuary of peace, quiet, solitude and change a few minutes away from the city centre (assuming that you time your visit with skill/luck).
    And, that lasting image of a day travelling to the islands and back? The dozen or so young women (and some not so young) in all kinds of fancy/flamboyant clothing (with sometime a handful of men available) making short videoclips on their cell phones – minutes at most. It wasn’t entirely clear what they were doing - posing, posturing and/or dancing in front of a friend who was filming them on the raised deck of the ferry boat – in front of the rest of us; until someone enlightened us – the uninitiated – with that key word pair: ‘TikTok’. Amazing and not a little sad - this urge to be ‘famous for 15 minutes.’
    In summary then … the ride across to the islands in the straits comes highly recommended. Take time out to explore the islands – easy, comfortable, compact and rewarding. Oh, and a last thought. Make sure that you DON’T need a latrine once you’ve left the mainland (or, at the very least, the ferry boat or the jetty on St. Michael’s). It’s a real hike back from Lazarus Island (or the bush) for those caught out.

    Peter Steele
    05June2023

    Written 15 June 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Richard A
    Jakarta, Indonesia2,046 contributions
    Lower Seletar Park and Reservoir are located in Sembawang / Mandai area. The park itself is not big but quite pleasant to visit and strolls with friends & family until you reach the reservoir which offers nice views.
    Written 13 January 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Linda
    1 contribution
    I was expecting a small island but turned out to be quite a huge place for walking through and that is awesome. Hopefully, more trees flourish here to form thicker canopy to make the place cooler.
    Written 25 December 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Nigel G
    Singapore, Singapore8,594 contributions
    Yesterday I took a Nature walk at Hindhede Quarry Nature Park. Nice afternoon out but very hot. From the car part there are a few steep steps uphill, but once at quarry lake level it’s all on the flat - brilliant views of the lake at the quarry.

    A terrapin or turtle in the lake - no birds about. There was an interesting spider - similar to a golden orb, but looking slightly different.

    Numerous monkeys in the trees and a cloudy monitor lizard on the wooded area. A flying insects nest noted on a tree. An Asian trampsnail on the trunk of a tree. Plenty of resting places along the way. Nice day out - I would probably go a little slower and more mindful of the environment had it been a little cooler. Don’t forget your water.

    Nice exhibition centre on the way down to the car park from the northerly approach. Refreshments available from vending machines. Careful of the monkeys.
    Written 25 January 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Liveyourdream_asia
    Singapore, Singapore1,402 contributions
    Fantastic place if you like wild nature and not crowded places x I usually come to Dairy Farm Park and other parks nearby in the morning. It’s such a fantastic place to connect with nature! In the mornings it’s so beautiful and peaceful here and not crowded (weekends are surely much worst). You can usually see here wild boars, lots of squirrels, flying colugo and monkeys.

    The best thing - Dairy Farm park interconnected with other parks with lots of possible roots - you can start for example from Dairy Farm, explore Wallace Educational Centre and go from there to Chestnut Park and even reach Singapore Zoo by walk or bicycle or you may go towards Singapore Quarry and later by Green Corridor reach Bukit Timah Nature Park, Hindhech Park or take the path towards Rifle Range Park.
    Written 9 January 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Daniel Octa Anugrah
    Bandung, Indonesia3 contributions
    A lots of monkey here. Also sometimes meet snake and wild pig. Quite dangerous and scary to be here. But very beautiful nature and ruins. No tickets needed
    Written 29 January 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Veronique2007
    Singapore, Singapore131 contributions
    I heard so many bad reviews that I was not expecting much from this dive spot. I was impressed having thought the worse. The visibility was around 3-4 meters, greenish water, no current. A lot of small critters around, lots of nudibranchs, crabs, goby...it was a real muck dive. Paid 130$ for 2 dives, we were 3 divers with 1 dive master. Great afternoon in great company.
    Written 26 July 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • SOH KIEN PENG
    Singapore, Singapore6,658 contributions
    This tour to Pulau Semakau is not a visit to a pristine island of serenity or for a relaxed sunbath on a sparkling beach of tranquility. This tour is to visit the graveyard where the ashes of tonnes and tonnes of the waste, the discarded by-product of what we consumed and used, are being land filled here as a solution to their disposal.

    The educational visit really widened my knowledge of waste management. It is easy to dump and discard the plastic bottles, the left-over food, the paper boxes, the rubbish after each meal into the garbage bins but the process of segregating the waste and converting them into ashes under high pressure and temperature in the incinerator and to land fill them at this island is really tedious and costly.

    Many developing countries could not afford to pay for this waste management process and you find heaps of rubbish discarded or dumped into rivers, roadside, backyards of residence, drainage, almost every corner of the countries.. The polluted environment led to further degeneration of the citizens' health and widespread of contagious and infectious diseases.

    Recently, the news have reported that few developed countries irresponsibly and unscrupulously dumped containers with tonnes of waste to poor developing countries hoping to save on the cost of disposal.

    This is the harsh reality we are facing and Singapore take very careful steps to ensure that the contaminants from the ash do not seep out from the land fills into the sea polluting and disrupting the existing ecosystems. Just imagine tonnes of non-biodegradable plastic waste are transformed into ashes by the incinerator plants and these ashes with much toxic contaminants leaked out from the land fills into the sea and consumed by the sea bass that were reared at the floating sea farms and the fish ended up on our plates. The serious health consequences would be catastrophic.

    Residential option on this land fill island appears impossible. Farming edible plants or fruit trees on such a land fill with contaminated ashes would also be detrimental to health. A more acceptable plant would be Jatropha where the fruits could be extracted for diesel.

    Mankind is in such a dilemma. The high cost of waste management will eat into taxpayers' money but can we live in a polluted environment of discarded rubbish.

    How many islands must we sacrifice for land fills to solve our waste management problems?

    Singapore is just such a tiny red dot. We have sacrificed Pulau Saekeng to create this land fills of Pulau Semakau. When the land fills has reached saturated point in 2035, can Singapore afford to sacrifice another offshore island to solve our waste management problem?

    It is challenging but we have to think of ways to reduce, reuse and recycle whatever we discard. REUSE, RECYCLE AND REDUCE WASTE - the 3 Rs and the 4th R is to REMEMBER this!

    I found this trip to this island memorable and thought provoking.
    Written 4 September 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Toby T
    18 contributions
    Good paths to lead you up to the Tree Top walk and back down. About 6kms. Tree top is worth the visit for the views and the view over the trees. We managed to get up close to a couple of long tailed Macaques at the TT entrance and a ranger pointed out a pit viper. So much nature and space on a crowded island. A good break for the family
    Written 6 June 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
Frequently Asked Questions about Singapore