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All reviews huge mosque inner courtyard whole complex mosque complex peaceful place stunning architecture arches entrance century visitors som majolica site walls mosaics photographs sights
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Reviewed 20 October 2019

Apart from its large courtyard, the pillared corridors also add to the beauty of the mosque. The lovely blue dome is truly eye-catching.

Date of experience: October 2019
Thank kiransfootprints
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Reviewed 17 October 2019

Great area to visit. Most interesting and enjoyable. Very well maintained area. Nice surroundings. Interesting assortment of tourists shopping in this area.

Date of experience: October 2019
Thank Annette D
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Reviewed 14 October 2019

The Kaylon Mosque is a must see in Bukhara. It is a part of the historical Poi Kalan complex which includes the Mir-i-Arab madrassa directly opposite and the famous Kaylon Minaret. It is located in the western area of the old city on Khodja Nurobobod Street, a short walk east of the Ark. This was the last attraction which we visited whilst walking through the old city and decided to take photographs of the exterior iwan at the eastern entrance, and didn't go to the Inner courtyard where an entrance fee is required. We regretted not venturing inside the mosque, but were just too tired after a long day.

The eastern entrance was built between 1514-1515 when Muizz ad-Din Abu-l Gazi Ubaidullah was governor of Bukhara. It is a "monument" iwan with a half dome. The three arched designs near to the top were particularly beautiful. The beautiful use of varying shades of blue tiles was as expected in buildings of this era. The main mosque which is seen after walking through this entrance, was structurally complete but not decorated until Ubaidullah became the first Khan of Bukhara between 1534-1539. The Shayabind Empire ruled Bukhara between 1505-1598. We had taken a photo of the blue dome of the mosque from the eastern walls of the Ark in the morning. The powder blue dome atop a supporting ring, reminded us of Iranian construction methods and can only be appreciated from the ark area, as only the top of the dome is seen from the courtyard.

The site of the mosque is historical, as other religious structures were built here since the 8th century but all were destroyed by war or poor building techniques. The most famous of which was the mosque built by the Karakhanid ruler Arslan-khan in 1127, with the Kaylon minaret to it's right. When Genghis Khan arrived in 1220, he laid waste to the city, including the mosque but spared the famous minaret. The ruins remained until Timurid times when plans were again made to reconstruct a mosque, but these were not realised until Ubaidullah became Governor. The mosque suffered the fate of other institutions in Soviet times when it was closed and used as a warehouse. It was reopened as a mosque after independence in 1991.

Other nearby attractions include the unique Emir Alim Khan Madrasah and bathhouse to the right of the Kaylon minaret, the trading domes on Khodja Nurobobod Street and the Ugulbek and Abdulaziz Khan madrassas which face each other in similar style to the Poi Kalan ensemble.

Date of experience: July 2019
2  Thank Andrew M
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Reviewed 30 September 2019

The large 16th Century mosque sits adjacent to the Kalon Minaret and opposite the Mir-i-Arab , a working Madressah. The mosque can cater for 10,000 people and is impressive with its 208 columns and 288 interior domes. There is a fee to enter. Definitely worth a visit and to the Minaret (go at night for the best impact)

Date of experience: September 2019
Thank Oldjack
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Reviewed 20 September 2019

In my opinion, this 16th century mosque is the finest monument in Bukhara. As is a common pattern, it faces another religious building (a madrassa) across an open square, creating an impressive ensemble. It is floodlit in the evening.

Date of experience: August 2019
Thank 16jamesdoc
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
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