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All reviewsgame reservesouthern africafishmain campgame drivesdiscovery roomwildlife viewinga special placeonce in a lifetimeleopard eatinggreat guidelarge bathroomleopards matingexcellent game viewingkeep coming backdry rivera great experience
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Reviewed 23 April 2009

If I could give this property 10 stars I would. This was our second safari trip to Southern Africa, and second visit to Mashatu Main Camp. The rooms, service and game viewing are all excellent! Since our first visit in 2002 the rooms have been refurbished, and I was very impressed with the change. The rooms are now suites (they enclosed the porch for a bigger room) which have 1 HUGE full bath plus a half bath. They even have his and hers luggage racks. The rooms are air conditioned, and the units are quiet! I have never seen anything like their housekeeping staff. Everything is immaculate and tidy (they kept lining up my toiletries!). They come into the room I think 3 times a day. The food is tasty and nutritious. For logistics reasons it's easier for them to make homemade everything - cookies, bread, etc. which was an extra bonus. We became friendly with Bobson, our ranger in 2002, who is now the camp manager. He is very accommodating and and all-around nice guy.

We find the rangers (who lead the game drives) at Mashatu Main Camp to be highly skilled, which means they are experts at “finding” you the animals you want to see. The game viewing in April with high grass, while not as unbelievable as dryer peak season July, was still outstanding. Our ranger this time was Bashi, a 15-year veteran of the camp. He is extremely skilled. We saw many animals this time, too many to list, including 3 different snakes which was totally awesome.

I highly recommend this property!!

  • Stayed: April 2009, travelled with family
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4  Thank CW22
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 28 November 2007

I chose this particular "tented" camp site for a reason. I enjoy the experience of a classic safari, where modern life does not encroach on the pristine nature that surrounds it. If you are lloking for "luxury" go to Main Camp, it will give you all the comforts of a hotel, and you can tell yourself you are still on safari. For those of you who really want the "true" safari experience, this is the campsite for you. I have to admit, even I who had just spent 21 days in numerous camps in Zimbabwe and Botswana had to think twice about staying here once I "checked in", as I was a lone female having left my spouse in jo'berg to work for the last 5 days of our vacation. When I entered my tent with its comfortable bed (as all theothers had) I realized the bathroom was OUTSIDE the back door zipper, and I had to stop and think about this one. This was the most "primitve or basic" of ANY camp I had ever stayed in in any of my safaris. BUT like the couple I met from California wine country who had the same reaction, we are both SO GLAD we chose to stay. this camp is NOT for the fainthearted! If you need to rise during the night to use the facility, get used to unzipping your tent and making the trip to the loo, and hope NORMAN isn't hiding in your wooden enclosure. Norman by the way is a 4 foot monitor who like to sqqueeze into the wooden slats at night when it got cold. He gave me a fright the first time I saw his claws come over the top of the loo. But I grew to get used to him and actually looked forward to seeing him. This camp is simple, but they feed you well and they feed you LOTS! The guides are wonderful as are teh staff. I think I liked it best because it was so basic. Animals CAN wander into the campsite, even tho there is a small electrified wire around, it is mainly to keep ellies out, not the leopards and antelope and other small little things, but that was what made it so exciting. I realy want to return to this camp. in the 4 days I spent here by myself I truly look forward to my return, and not to main camp but back to the tents. The hours I spent inthe hide watching the animals was wonderful, even the sad sight of a mother carrying her dead baby babboon around and the males trying to snatch it away from her. The animals put on an incredible show. This place is a MUST if you don't mind the outdoor shower and loo. I saw 3 prides of lions 2 different leopards and abundance of eland, giraffe, not as many ellies as all the water had dried up, but so many other animal life it was fantastic. Surprisingly high number of bird species - and many great photos of birdlife, despite the apparent lack of water. I highly recommend this place for most safari enthusiasts.

  • Stayed: September 2007, travelled solo
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6  Thank Cindy-Milford
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 25 March 2007

I am a tour operator here in southern Africa, and stay at different lodges pretty much every few weeks. This is the one place I can't help but return to, and pay for, despite other lodges offering free rooms. My May, I'll have gone there three times this year alone!
I tend to stay at tent camp, and have brought several different groups of friends, family, and clients there. The rangers and trackers are top notch. The staff really make you feel welcome, and rather than being obsequious, as with some lodges, really make an effort to get to know you, without being pushy.
I really can't say enough about this place. Don't miss the mountain biking safaris, the excellent archaeology safari (even if you're not into archaeology!) and if you're an experienced rider, the horse safaris.

  • Stayed: January 2007, travelled as a couple
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5  Thank Vilasy
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
A TripAdvisor Member
125
Reviewed 22 March 2006

Mashatu is a special place. It is worth the effort in getting there. You will enjoy the welcome companionship of inspired new friends, fantastic food, special encounters with Nature and a peaceful comfort you will not want to leave behind, so you take it with you. In your heart.

We arrived into Limpopo Airfield around 2:00pm and also into a 38oC “hairdryer wind” and were glad of the bottled water supplied by the Sefofane pilots. We cleared customs and immigration (what there was of it) and boarded our Swiss Army truck for the transfer to Mashatu Main Camp. Journey time was about 40 minutes through a searing, dusty breeze. On arrival at Mashatu, we were given a warm welcome (not that we hadn't had one already) by Justin, the manager and were offered cool towels and cold drinks.

Once we all signed in and said we wouldn't sue them if a lion ripped our legs off, we were shown to our various suites. The accommodation is accurately represented in the brochures. The feel is one of relaxed elegance mixed with the traditional décor and fittings. I took advantage of the short break we were offered to just sit and think for a while. I was beginning to get a picture of the adventure, scenery, experiences and possibilities to learn so much more about this part of Africa..........and I couldn't wait!

Other great people with whom we were to become acquainted included; Bobson, (a guide and much more) who has been here for six years. 'Fish', who was to be our ranger for the next two days. His knowledge was fantastic, and his temperament was one of 'cool'. Paul Grobler, who is the palaeontology and nature expert ranger (and a great mountain biker), was a hit with the ladies, especially when he slipped into his Lycra riding pants the following day.

We were invited to help ourselves to light snacks and coffee etc. prior to our first game drive. We duly set off out the main gate full of anticipation and hope and we were not to be disappointed. Mashatu use Toyota Land cruisers for game drives. They can comfortably carry 10 passengers, but for us, we travelled in two groups of five and in my vehicle, we had 'Obi riding shotgun’ at the back.
Our first encounter was a lone giraffe, which seemed to be trying to hide behind a bush that was about half its height, which was both pointless and amusing at the same time. After a short drive, Fish took us to an area he knew that had offered good sightings of Lion over the last few days.

We were treated to watching three cubs (one male, two female), their mother and their grandmother. It always astounds me how passive they remain in the presence of humans. Thankfully, if they get annoyed, they usually just skulk away into the bush and leave you to look for something else. From here it was on to a Mashatu Tree (from where the camp and game reserve take their names). There were two leopards reclining in the upper branches (I thought this odd as they are usually solitary animals, but they could be siblings) and they looked as though they weren't planning on going anywhere.

One of them looked so relaxed, we had suspicions about it being a stuffed toy, but as Fish told us, they will start moving nearer sunset. This was the first of many times he was to be proved correct. The Leopard is now my favourite animal. We have all seen pictures, documentaries and articles in the media, but nothing can prepare you for your first sighting, and being just a few feet from these beautiful creatures and observing them in their natural habitat. Hushed silence and respect (and perhaps, a little trepidation) was the general feeling amongst us.

The Leopards seemed unlikely to do very much, and Fish thought we'd have better luck a few kilometres further away. Again he was 'spot' on. The next stop was another Mashatu where there were THREE leopards, just about ready to go out on the prowl. As far as I was concerned this was perfect timing. We sat under the tree in collective awe at these magnificent creatures for about 30 minutes and then moved back to the 'Other Leopard Tree'. (More good luck) The male had gone but the female was just taking in the sunset, and possibly trying to sight or sense her prey for the evening.

I could easily write at length about that first evenings sightings but as there were going to be so many more drives (I had 10 days ahead of me) I will just say that on the way back to camp we saw the lion cubs once more, an elephant, and Fish asked us not to scare it with flashes, as it may have been in a fight (it was missing a tusk) So we headed for our sundowners and then on back to camp, seeing impala, eland, a few baboons and a jackal trying unsuccessfully to catch a bush buck. Incidentally, game drives at Mashatu are all off-road, increasing the wealth of close up experiences with nature.

What a fabulous first day in the bush! This part of Africa invites you to immerse yourself in the world of highly experienced elephant and leopard researchers and wildlife rangers and trackers in Botswana's Northern Tuli Game Reserve, which borders on the Limpopo River in Southern Africa. Mashatu's 80,000 acres of vast, arid land offers some of Africa's best game viewing.

We arrived back at camp, and, after freshening up, convened in The ‘Gin Trap’ before being regally summoned into the boma for a fabulous dinner of beetroot soup, beef and black cherry pie (that was a first!) and rounded off with a surprising selection of desserts. We all enthused about the day’s experiences and shared anecdotes about what we had seen and done. As the time rolled on, we adjourned for a night cap at the bar and were all safely tucked up by about 10:30pm

Day Three; Saturday, November 5th

Without the aid of a wake up call, I stirred at 5:00am and gazed out over the waterhole. The African sun in these parts rises about 5:15am in November. I slipped outside, trying not to disturb my slumbering roommate, Paddy, and headed up to the terrace for the dawn coffee and orange juice, which (game drive or no game drive) I see as a sensible start to any day.

I wasn't surprised to see Fish, Bobson and Justin on the terrace (I'm certain some of these guys never sleep) preparing the necessary caffeine and vitamin fixes for their guests along with a few ‘carbs’ in the form of blueberry muffins, and so forth.

Throughout the whole of my journey; I was to find that I was awake at first light every morning, quite voluntarily. This, I believe, was because Africa wakes the visitor early and extends a personal invitation to make the most of every precious day. A few sleepy heads eventually rolled up (thankfully all still attached to their bodies) and after sufficient coffee etc, we were on our way with Paul and his rifle. He gave us a briefing about the possibility of encountering dangerous wild animals and asked us to follow his instructions. None of us had a problem with that and so off we went. He took us past Leadwood trees and told us about their origin and demonstrated their unbelievable density (heavier than mahogany, and probably thicker than us!). We walked by the waterhole and he crouched and pointed to a few prints in the muddy area near the waters edge, and asked if we could identify it. One of the gang said they though it was a brown hyena’s print. He looked impressed at first and then asked how they could be sure.

"I heard you speaking to someone at the bar last night while you were looking at a brown hyena and pointing to where we are now standing" He nodded, chuckled and simply said "I'm watching you"! It was pointed out that, as he was the one with the gun, and he had taken his "12 disciples into the wilderness’ we’d be watching HIM!

We continued our walk, learning about the geology of the area, the small rock dassies (a relation to the elephant but the size of a hedgehog) and the story of the “Shepherd Tree”, and how an animal will browse from the foliage and then rest under it’s shade in the midday heat, defecate and then move on. Their droppings sustain the tree and in turn feed the animal. Symbiosis in its simplest form! During the walk Paul asked us questions, patiently waited for one of us to offer the most hideously inaccurate answer and then, gently, he explained the truth. The general consensus seemed to be: “How little we know, and what a privilege to be in the company of an expert”

We walked on to the foot of the White Cliffs, which take their name from the centuries old deposits by the rock dassies urine upon the rocks. (Rock Dassie or the Rock Hyrax: a small gregarious animal, found in colonies of up to 50, are fast feeders, grazing for less than one hour a day) I’d last seen these cute creatures on Table Mountain; we walked on and climbed to the summit for some fantastic views over the reserve. From here we rendezvoused, on the lower side of the mountain, with a few of the trusty guides that had driven out to our meeting point with coffees and snacks for us. They’d also brought us all our mountain bikes for the cycling safari back to camp. These safaris are for mountain bike enthusiasts. (Oops!) Although the landscapes seemed pretty flat, up close they can present a challenging way of exploring the surroundings. They are led, always, by an experienced, armed ranger who is in radio contact with the camp, as well as a second ranger / tracker following close behind the group. On this occasion it was Jeanetta who watched our backs. Safety is the main concern here.

We all set off with varying degrees of ability and temperament and safely made it back to camp. Not entirely without some collateral damage however. Jenny, from Cape Town took a spill and hurt her shin and ankle. I was carrying some antiseptic and plasters for such an eventuality but she was able to continue without any help. I was glad I’d brought them though, as I also took a tumble and gashed my knee on a stray rock, lurking just beneath the fine sand. I was trying to avoid riding into the dreaded Thorned Leadwood tree (branches like razor wire), and so did a bit of self-administering (albeit very sheepishly). A few of the group looked concerned and asked if I was OK. I told them the bike was fine, but I’d developed a puncture in my leg (Oh! how we laughed) And on we went. A few of us went to relieve our aching muscles in the pool for a while and then headed up to the terrace for brunch. It was hard to believe we’d had such an educational and fun morning and it was still only 10:00am.

After brunch some of the group headed back to their accommodation and I went exploring the camps facilities. The Discovery Room, at the far end of the camp, I found fascinating. It was pleasantly cooler than outside in the midday sun. It is yet another way of learning more about the reserve and nature. It is a base for the scientific research conducted here at the camp and a “magnifying glass” through which the animals and history of Mashatu can be examined. Grace, who runs the curio shop, is Fishes wife and is quite a conversationalist. They have 3 children, but she is still happy anyway (her words, not mine) and will gladly chat with you, whether or not you make a purchase. I returned to the vantage point on the terrace for a cool drink and to watch the wildlife come and go at the water hole. (I wondered if it dried completely would they call it Peter’s Pan?) This is a perfect, shaded spot to write some notes or just relax and consider this amazing place. The cycle ride evidently sapped several of us of some much-needed energy. I was the only one not in their room. The water hole was quiet but a few ambling impala, kudu, baboons and eland wandered by for a drink.

Later on, in the afternoon, Jeanetta us offered the choice of horseback rides, an archaeological tour or a game drive. A few of the ladies went riding, a couple of the lads went for the “ruins tour” as it was known, and I looked forward to my second game drive. After some snacks and coffee, we were on our way about 4:00pm.
This time out we had only travelled a short distance and saw 7 giraffe, 2 leopards, loads of kudu and regular scatterings of guinea fowl and francolin birds. I was delighted to return to the lions and their cubs. Again, another fabulous, enlightening and enthralling few hours were given to us by the local wildlife, expertly narrated by Fish

We left the lions and headed off for our sundowners, which I came to regard as a way of appreciatively toasting another spectacular day. Fish took us back to the Leopard Tree, where the female was still there. At the foot of the tree was a dead impala with its hindquarters chewed away, and the leopard didn't seem ready for 'seconds'. (Some of the rangers described the impala as ‘MacDonald’s’, suggesting it was fast food for the predators. Evidently some weren’t ‘fast’ enough.

Heading back we saw a lone teenaged elephant scurrying along. Perhaps he sensed the other predators' suppertime was approaching? The end of another fantastic day was approaching. We were treated to some nocturnal birdsong after sunset. It’s not hard to understand why some people return to places like this year after year. It delights the eye and pleases the ear. Nature always delivers. You just have to keep your eyes and ears open.

On arrival back at camp, we had time to freshen up and convene in the ‘Gin Trap’ again. I had a chance to talk with Jeanetta about the Elephant project in which she was involved. Their size alone makes elephants difficult to manage. But Jeanetta Selier is pulling it off, monitoring their movement and resolving problems associated with their burgeoning population. I was particularly impressed with her passion and knowledge, for what is really her vocation.

Over dinner she explained to us all the methods and benefits of her work and I found out about her volunteer programme for those who want to take time out of the “rat race” and come and get involved. She is similarly involved with cheetahs. Appropriately enough, after dinner, we adjourned to the terrace for a nightcap and, just as a gentle rain began to fall, we were treated to a visit of nine elephants at the water hole. They say elephants never forget, but I shall “remember, remember the fifth of November.” It was as if they came to say goodbye, as we were leaving camp the next day.

Day Four; Sunday, November 6th

Another dawn, another day, and more juice and coffee before Fish took us on our final game drive here. There was news of a family of cheetah near the White Cliffs, but, with the intermittent thunder and lightning, some of the young cubs were getting scared. We witnessed their mother 'barking' for her babies. The family had managed to get split up. After a while in the drizzle, Fish cut the engine and he explained that he could hear the cubs calling back at their mother. His senses far out-weighing ours, again, as we really had to focus and then, we THINK we heard the sounds to which he was alluding.

We were very, very lucky to see Cheetah. It was a lone female, looking quite concerned and very skittish. On this occasion, Fish tried hard to get us close but even with a 4WD, we were no match for the cheetah as she scaled the white cliffs and found her cubs before disappearing from view altogether. There are a fair number of these elegant creatures on Mashatu but later on in the trip I was surprised to learn something about Kruger, which we were to experience on the next two visits. Look at these surprising statistics; In South Africa's huge Kruger National Park, there are about 10,000 elephant and 25,000 buffalo and about 2,000 Lions. Leopards? A thousand. But there are only 200 cheetahs. Now, some of this I found out when I spent time in the Discovery room back at camp but there is no substitute for sitting with a ranger, who knows so much about his game reserve and hearing first hand, the real facts. There is a major problem with their gene pool.


Botswana is the last stronghold of the cheetah population. Most recent surveys indicate a population of around 1700. This represents 12% of the world Cheetah population! Being timid, non-aggressive animals by nature, cheetahs are mostly found outside conservation areas, on large commercial farmlands where they do not have to compete with stronger predators. However, many farmers wrongly perceive cheetahs as a threat to their livestock and indiscriminately shoot them, and, in most cases there is no reliable proof that the individual was a "problem" animal.

We found our lion family again. The cubs were joyously filthy from playing in the wet dirt. The granny was resting and two cubs were intermittently annoying her. The third cub (a male) was learning to feed off last nights kill, a large male Kudu, with his mother. On the way back to camp, Fish took us for an inspection of The Mashatu Tented Camp and we were introduced to Greg and Nicholene who are the managers. It has a very rustic and isolated feel, an excellent hide for close up silent game viewing and charming tented accommodation.

It is a little more modest than the Main Camp, but that is reflected in the price. It is located in the northern area of the Reserve and provides a rustic, luxury safari experience. The Tented Camp only allows a maximum of 14 guests at a time, thus providing an ideal, private getaway. Accommodation is in the form of seven twin tents all equipped with modern amenities and comfortable beds. Each tent has an en suite bathroom with shower.

Guests have the option to enjoy meals on their private deck, or can enjoy traditional campfire dinners in the boma. At Mashatu Tented Camp “comfort” is the priority of your hosts. You even have your own plunge pool and all beds have mosquito nests. While on game drives, or enjoying any of the adventure expeditions, you will be attended to by your ranger. On your return to the camp, the staff will take very good care of you. Age restrictions apply and, in the interest of safety, no children under the age of 12 years are permitted here.

This was a common aspect regarding children. Imagine the scenario when, say, a little six year old freaks out when there is a lion a few feet away and starts screaming and having a tantrum (even worse than in your local supermarket on a Saturday?) How safe do you think YOU, or the Lion / Leopard / Bull Elephant would feel?

From here, we headed back to the Main camp for brunch. Afterwards, with a little spare time before we had to catch our flight, we had a quick game drive on the way to the Limpopo Valley Horse Safaris location. It's very specialist but seemed fascinating to me. The rides explore the Mashatu Reserve and you should see just as much variety of game as on the Tuli Trail including the elephant for which the area is so famous. While staying at Fort Jameson, (the actual guest lodge) you could, if you wish it, have a game ride each day and night drives sounded particularly exciting. There is also a waterhole and hide just outside Fort Jameson which gives wonderful opportunities also for eland, impala, wildebeest, giraffe and zebra game viewing. Fort Jameson has five log chalets built on stilts. Each has en suite flush loo, shower and hot & cold water.

There is a central thatched brick house in which the bar and dining room are located and a small pool, essential for their hot summer afternoons. Depending on the weather, you either eat inside the lodge or outside at a long table. A delicious looking variety of dishes is served buffet style.

During the short drive to the airfield we passed more giraffe, buffalo, baboon, eland, zebra (and was that a cheetah?), but as we rolled along Fish spotted something from about 150 metres away. (These guys amaze me) We went down and through a shallow gully and swung around near the base of a camel thorn tree with three very irate little tree squirrels darting about near the base of their tree. Then we say the cause of the problem. An African Rock Python (now called just "African Python"). This is the largest species of snake in Africa. It has two heat sensitive pits on the upper lip, enabling it to detect the body heat of its prey, and strike accurately, even in the dark. The squirrels are also known as bush squirrels, which indicate its bushveld habitat. They are found in savannah woodlands, including a wide variety of woodland variations. Trees with suitable nest holes are favoured, but holes in the ground are sometimes used. With all the haranguing by the squirrels, the python slid off beneath a fallen tree trunk and buried himself away from the noise.

Some information I learned from Fish, but the rest I’d studied in the Discovery Room, back at camp. We also paused at one of the many termite mounds, which are prolific just about everywhere you go in this part of Africa. We were treated to an interesting display from a little colony of dwarf mongoose, excitedly observing us, as we observed them. To the uninitiated, they appear related to brunette-coloured Meerkats and, if you watch closely (as they do) they appear to have one or two lookouts on guard, on a rota basis, standing on their hind legs, whilst the rest of the posse run about. One of the girls on our 4WD wondered, aloud, why some of these “attractive vermin” (there’s an oxymoron, if ever there was one!) seemed to keep disappearing below ground only to reappear moments later. I suggested that they were going into their subterranean bolthole to report their sightings to the ‘secretary’, much in the same way that humans tick off their various sightings on their lists! (Ooh, I got two Germans, a few English, and one that looked Australian! but I can’t be sure” How are you doing?)

We were whisked along to Limpopo airfield for the formalities of leaving Botswana. After we filled in our forms and got our passports stamped and said our farewells to the team, we boarded our 'caravan'. Robert taxied us to the end of the runway, but we had to wait for the customs man to close his office and climb to the top of the control tower before we were given clearance! (To those of you that know Trumpton, I think you get the picture) I think he's glad he doesn't have to climb the stairs too often in this heat.

Mashatu is a special place. It is worth the effort in getting there. You will enjoy great company, fantastic food, special moments with Nature and a peaceful comfort you will not want to leave behind, so you take it with you. In your heart.

  • Stayed: November 2005, travelled on business
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25  Thank A TripAdvisor Member
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 26 May 2018 via mobile
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Stayed: June 2017, travelled as a couple
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
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